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Exploring An Old Romanian Traditional House

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A Romanian Traditional House From XVIIIth Century

Traditional House

The house belongs to Lelcu Elena, from Bukovina.

It felt like we found a treasury. And we did. We could find a picture of it in “Old Houses from Bukovina”, a 1950’s book.

Romanian Traditional House

Romanian Traditional House

The owners couldn’t tell an exact age of the house, they approximate it is 250 years old. Three generations have lived inside the house, after it was moved from it’s original place and reassembled by their grand grandfather. This house is unchanged from the XVIIIth century and is still inhabited. The Lelcu family’s neighbors consider them poor by not having modernized their house, like the rest of the villagers, but they know the high value of their house, as it is, and were proud to show us it’s secrets.

The Romanian Traditional Architecture

 

Romanian Traditional Architecture

The log house gives the feeling of a safe, long lasting structure, built on river stones foundation.

The construction is massive enough, considering it’s size, of 8 x 5 m. Long fir logs were laid up and hold together with wooden nails.

Romanian Traditional Architecture

This technique prevented the walls from bending in time. The logs were aligned manually as they are stacked, and fixed one above the other using precise corner joints.

Log House

Then, they were covered in clay and painted.

Log House

The hip roof is made of wood pieces, also caught with wooden nails.

Exploring Attic

It is constructed on a rectangular plan, having two triangular sides and two trapezoidal ones.

Exploring Attic

The house consists of an entrance hall (tinda), and two rooms. The entrance hall has access to each room and attic.

The Romanian Peasant House Design

We enter an antique door, made from a single piece of wood, with a rudimentary door locking system.

 

Romanian Peasant House

In front, we access the kitchen chamber. In the past, this room was only used for storage.

 

Peasant House

The living room is the most important part of a traditional house: everything happens here. It’s the place where they eat, sleep and spend most of their time. The effects of hiding some elements, like the hutch buffet, while emphasizing others, like the bed side, was necessary to manipulate the eye toward the most beautiful part of the room, while ignoring the rest of it. This is why all Romanian traditional houses respect the same organisational design principles:

  • To warm up the room, a wood burning stove is located on the immediate left side of the door.

Peasant House

  • The bed stands next to the stove, in the hottest part of the room. These ornaments consist on handmade tapestry, bed coverings, pillows, towels, rugs, all eye catching and exposed to prove the diligence of the housewife. They also serve to protect the walls against the cold. To create a great ambiance, during the day, the beds are covered in woolen covers, the pillows are kept on top of the wall, on a fir log, especially designed for this purpose.

Peasant House

  • The table is on the right side of the room.

Peasant House

  • The hutch buffet is placed on the right side of the door, on the same wall. You will enter the door and not even notice there is a hutch buffet on the right, because the bed area ornaments will catch your attention.

Peasant House

Some Antique Traditional Treasuries

  • The first thing we saw, was the enamel kerosene lamp, manually painted, a really old piece, that was buried during WW2, when they had to evacuate their home;

Romanian Peasant House

  • We delighted our eyes with very old peasant blouses, folk skirts, woolen waist belts and traditional rugs;

Peasant Blouses

  • Woolen Waist BeltsFolk SkirtsPeasant Blouses
  • Wonderful old fabrics with floral and geometric patterns;Traditional RugsTraditional RugsTraditional Rugs

    Traditional Rugs

  • Religious paintings witness an artist’ s commitment: Lelcu Dumitru (27 sept. 1951 – 12 nov. 2012).

Peasant House
Exploring the Attic

 

Exploring Attic

The fumes escape inside the attic, through two vents built at 50 cm height from the ceiling. The smoke is drawing through two holes in the roof (see first picture). We call it a house “with eyes in it’s roof”.

Exploring Attic

This is a typical characteristic for an antique cottage, with double meaning:

  • the smoke prevents wood rot;

Exploring Attic

  • peasants smoke meat, bacon and sausages in the attic.
  • Exploring Attic

We found a few old smoked beauties. The long and thick spindles served to spin the flax and hemp. The thin, short ones are best to spin the wool with.

 

Exploring Attic

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